Why Slow and Steady Wins the Race in Social Media

A lot of the times, new business pop up and their owners are so excited about this new venture that they think they need to see quick growth on social media. This mindset may lead them to make some rash decisions such as buying followers or spending too much on ads. And it may look impressive to investors to have gained over 1,000 followers in under a month, but savvy investors know there's more to it than that. And the day-to-day consumer probably won't even pay attention.

Let's get this out of the way right at the front: Do not buy followers. No one knows for sure, but it's estimated that about 15% of social media accounts are bots. That's 15% of about 3 billion. So, if you had every bot on Twitter following you, it would bring your follower count up to about 450 million. Sounds impressive, right? It does right up until you realize that bots aren't buying your products or telling any real people about you. You could make the case that the high number of foll…

Green Onion: Duck Sues Disney World for Performance Income

ORLANDO, FL -- According to a duck's legal representative, the duck has been performing for five years in Disney World's Epcot Center and has seen little more than scraps of bread from guests as compensation. The duck regularly entertains guests as a pre-show warmup to the nightly IllumiNations fireworks show. He and his wife allegedly bring home barely enough scrap food for them and their five ducklings to survive.


"The fact is that the Disney company has been benefiting from this duck's talent for years without giving any second thought to compensation," said the duck's lawyer, "It's my understanding that they believed the scraps of food he was receiving were enough, but that is hardly a livable wage."

A spokesperson for the Walt Disney Company maintained that they do not hire ducks for pre-show warmups. "No contract was signed, there was no hiring process. You can't just show up at Disney World, waddle around for a few hours and expect to be paid."

"Now we really have a case," the duck's lawyer responded, "As we all know, cartoons were originally pre-show warmups to feature films. Disney has employed a duck in this capacity for well over 80 years."

According to the duck's legal representative, he should be entitled to up to $14,000 in back payments and $12 per hour moving forward.

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